Friday, October 29, 2004

some thoughts on the rise of the number of abortions...

from this blog... please read his entire article there... it really challenges the idea that legislation of morality is an effective means for promoting healthy behavior...

Abortion in Context, from the Alan Guttmacher Institute, has been very illuminating, and has challenged many of my preconceptions about abortion.

Yet, while it may seem paradoxical, a country’s abortion rate is not closely correlated with whether abortion is legal there. For example, abortion levels are quite high in Latin American countries, where abortion is highly restricted. (In fact, 20 million of the 46 million abortions performed annually worldwide occur in countries with highly restrictive abortion laws.) At the same time, abortion rates are quite low throughout Western Europe, where the procedure is legal and widely available. Also, Eastern and Western Europe have the world’s highest and lowest abortion rates, respectively, yet abortion is generally legal throughout the Continent.

If legality is not the determining factor, what drives the rates at which abortions occur in a given country? Clearly, a key factor is the rate at which women experience unintended pregnancies—itself a function of the interplay between a couple’s family-size (and timing) goals and their contraceptive use.

I have previously assumed that, if abortion were illegal, it would be rare. Apparently this is not the case, and I stand correct


i just think some of his thoughts are timely... that is, most single-issue voters are considering the abortion issue bush's golden ticket to their vote... but doesnt this complicate the simplicity of such thoughts?...

1 comment:

Antonio Cervantes Hodges said...

I like what you have to say. I believe many of todays problems that plague society and moral standards can't be fixed by legislation. Though a government should not endorse specific behaviors, these behaviors are a product of a deeper illness. That of the heart.

The key factor that isn't talked too much about these days is the calling that the Church (as a whole) has to confront these evils. I strongly believe that if the Church would rise up to its God-given duties and responsibilities, we wouldn't have to rely so much on government to hold these moral standards.